AS FAR AS I CAN WALK

STRAHINJA BANOVIĆ

By Stefan ARSENIJEVIC

SOUL FOOD FILMS - as SALES All rights, World

Drama - Completed 2021

A re-imagining of a traditional medieval epic in which contemporary African migrants take the place of Serbian national heroes. Urgent and timeless at the same time, the adaptation raises questions about identity, tradition, race and love.

Festivals
& Awards

Karlovy Vary IFF 2021
Europa Cinemas Label
Pingyao IFF 2021
Official Competition
Kinenova IFF 2021
Main Competition - Opening Film
Thessaloniki International Film Festival 2021
Balkan Survey
Seville European Film Festival 2021
Extraordinary Stories Competition
Zagreb International Film Festival 2021
Main Program - Feature Competition
Cairo International Film Festival 2021
Official Selection Out of Competition
Karlovy Vary 2021
Crystal Globe Competition- Grand Prix Crystal Globe for the Best Film
    • Year of production
    • 2021
    • Genres
    • Drama
    • Countries
    • SERBIA, LUXEMBOURG, FRANCE, BULGARIA, LITHUANIA
    • Languages
    • ENGLISH, SERBIAN
    • Duration
    • 92 mn
    • Director(s)
    • Stefan ARSENIJEVIC
    • Writer(s)
    • Stefan ARSENIJEVIĆ, Bojan VULETIĆ, Nicolas DUCRAY
    • Producer(s)
    • Miroslav MOGOROVIĆ (Art & Popcorn)
    • Synopsis
    • Strahinya and his wife, Ababuo, both 28, left Ghana at the beginning of the migrant crisis. They managed to reach Germany but were deported back to Belgrade.
      Serbia may not be Germany, but Strahinya does his best to start a new life. He works hard to secure asylum, trying out as a football player for a local club and working as a volunteer for the Red Cross. The process, however, is lengthy and Ababuo, a passionate woman aspiring to become an actress in London, feels unfulfilled in their life.
      One night, a new group of Syrian refugees arrive, on their way to Western Europe. One of them is Ali, a charismatic left-wing activist. Ababuo initially mocks him, but, the very next day, leaves Serbia with him, providing no explanation. Strahinya sets off along the Balkan migrant route for completely different reasons than anyone else: for love.
      A reimagining of the medieval Serbian epic poem Banovich Strahinya in which contemporary African migrants take the place of Serbian national heroes. Urgent and timeless at the same time, this adaptation raises questions about identity, tradition, race and love.